1902
Formal Jewish education begins in Manitoba with the establishment of the first Jewish studies program (Talmud Torah) in Winnipeg, as King Edward School on Selkirk Avenue opens its doors for children of Jewish immigrants, offering a curriculum of Hebrew language, Talmud, Jewish literature and history.
1902
1907
Rabbi Israel Kahanovitch (1872-1945), chief rabbi of Winnipeg, establishes the Winnipeg Hebrew Free School–Talmud Torah in its own building at the corner of Dufferin and Aikins in the city’s north end, where the majority of the city’s Jewish community resides.
1907
1913
Rabbi Kahanovitch, now chief rabbi of all Western Canada, works with local architect Max Blankstein to create a new building at the corner Charles Street and Flora Avenue to accommodate the growing Hebrew Free School-Talmud Torah. It includes classrooms, meeting rooms, a library and a large auditorium for Shabbat and holiday services, lectures, weddings, conferences and concerts. With classes on weekday afternoons and Sunday mornings, it was considered one of the top three Talmud Torah schools in North America, along with those in New York City and Boston.
1913
1914
Secular Yiddish language education begins in two rented classrooms at Aberdeen School, under the banner of the Jewish Radical School. In 1915, the school is renamed I. L. Peretz School, honouring the famed Yiddish writer. Within the year, 92 students are enrolled, and the school relocates to a building on McKenzie Street. As enrollment continues to rise, the school moves to Burrows Avenue in 1917, then to Aberdeen Avenue in 1922. The latter is expanded in the 1930s, becoming the largest K to 12 Jewish day school in North America. In 1927, Zionists seeking more emphasis on Zionism and Hebrew instruction split off to form the Jewish Folk School on St Johns Avenue.
1914
1944
The Jewish Folk School re-joins with I. L. Peretz School to become the I. L. Peretz Folk School, located on Aberdeen Avenue. The school expands to include satellite campuses on Aikins Street (1950) and Jefferson Avenue (1956).
1944
1959
Talmud Torah grows following WW II, when Rabbi Avbraham Kravetz (1914-1962) becomes the new principal. Under his leadership, the school moves to Matheson Avenue, and a high school program is developed. Joseph Wolinsky Collegiate opens, offering full-day classes that include general and Judaic studies for Grades 8 though 11. The same year, Ramah Hebrew School, a Grade 1 to 6 Jewish day school, opens at Lanark and Grant in River Heights to accommodate a growing Jewish population in Winnipeg's south end. The curriculum includes Hebrew language, Talmud and general studies.
1959
1983
The Winnipeg Board of Jewish Education combines ILPFS and the Talmud Torah (Winnipeg Hebrew School) to form Talmud Torah-I. L. Peretz Folk School at the Matheson Avenue location.
1983
1997
The WBJE amalgamates Talmud Torah-I.L. Peretz Folk School, Joseph Wolinsky Collegiate and Ramah Hebrew School and opens Gray Academy of Jewish Education at the new Asper Jewish Community Campus in the south end of Winnipeg, Gray Academy is comprised of three divisions - Shore Early Years School, Simkin Middle School, and Joseph Wolinsky Collegiate.
1997
2004
Shore Early Years School, Simkin Middle School and Joseph Wolinsky Collegiate amalgamate to become a single school - Gray Academy of Jewish Education. Today, Gray Academy is Western Canada's only K-Grade 12 Jewish day school. Building on a long legacy, Gray Academy provides an environment of academic excellence, framed by Jewish values.
2004